Monday, July 30, 2012

More Monday Murals

 This mural, located on the side of Davis Chiropractic, is 38' long and 8' high.  It tells the story of the beginning of the caladium story in Lake Placid. "Captain" T.W.Webb was one of the first caladium growers in the 1930's.  Capt. Webb discovered these bulbs, native to the Amazon River Valley of South America, on a visit to Tampa.  He brought some of them home, put them in the ground, and some 80 years later, the sale of caladiums represents a multi-million dollar industry and the bulbs are sold around the world.

In addition to cultivating his 10 acres of caladiums, he also opened the town's first service station in 1924.  This was the only station between Sebring and West Palm Beach.  His Studebaker was one of the first cars in town.  He also sponsored Golden Gloves boxing and built a boxing ring next to the service station to give folks something fun to do or watch.  They called the events "The Thursday Night Fights".

His real love was horticulture and he was hired by the town to replant and recondition the public golf course. He served on the town council, and had the first certified Red Cross station in the area, teaching Red Cross first aid and water safety lifesaving to Highlands County residents and the Brighton Indian Reservation.

In addition to all of this - he was the town's first Boy Scout Scoutmaster!  I think it is entirely fitting that he have his very own mural!

Linking to Monday Murals.

20 comments:

Beth said...

i've always enjoyed murals ... they always seem to have a story & it's like you get a chance to get into the painter/artist's mind for a moment or two. i wonder how it all begins does some one have input or do they get to make the whole plan? too cool. (:

Sheeps and Peeps Farm said...

great photos... really interesting story!

VioletSky said...

who would have thought a few planted bulbs would become such a huge business?!

PerthDailyPhoto said...

Absolutely Linda, I love a mural that tells such a relevant story. Capt. Webb certainly was a community minded citizen.

HOOTIN ANNI said...

I had a beautiful one in our front yard....then, one winter, even covering it and trying to protect it....we had a hard freeze for this area of the South, and it never did come back to life. :o(

I so love these mural shares and the stories you add.

Amy Burzese said...

A beautifully done mural. Thanks for sharing the info too.

Valladolid Daily Photo said...

This shows us that graffiti murals can be educational too.

La Principessa Errante said...

What an absolutely fascinating story. I will never look at caladiums again the same way. How really amazing. I must admit, my grandfather sold the first studebaker in his town, so I can really relate to the history on this one.

TexWisGirl said...

he certainly left his mark on that area - glad they put his mark on a mural for all to see. :)

hamilton said...

We have Thursday Cruise Nights were one can see old Studebakers. No boxing though. and sadly, no outdoor caladiums, either.

heyBJK said...

What a cool mural! And with some history. I like the work that went into that.

s.c said...

Nice story and you can see how a total uninspired building facade can become a joy to look at. Thanks for showing.

Grandma Barb's This and That said...

What a great mural and story.

Cheryl @ The Farmer's Daughter said...

That is a beautiful mural! Nice story, too.

RedPat said...

It certainly tells his story well!

eileeninmd said...

Linda, neat story and post. The mural is really cool.

Oakland Daily Photo said...

Fabulous mural and history. Never wondered before where caladiums came from. Now I know. My eye, however, really was captured by the boxing scene. Reminds me of the work of Midwest artists like De Martelly and Thomas Hart Benton. After learning Capt. Webb's story, no one can say a single individual cannot have a large impact on his community. Thanks for participating in this week's Monday Mural.

Red said...

He deserves a mural and this one is awesome as it is very realistic.

kaye said...

that's amazing!

Rita said...

Interesting story and the kind of man that most communities would love to have as a neighbor.

Wonderful photos of this mural as well. I did not know all this about the caladiums.